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Shift
thinking

Chase
your future

Defy the
impossible

Be future
proof

Break
boundaries

In a time where technology is changing the world, where people don't just agree with how it is, but how it could be, we're a university that's leading the way.

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  • 2013
  • 2012
  • 2011
  • 2010
  • 2009
  • 2008
  • 2007
  • 2006
  • 2005
  • 2004
  • 2003
  • 2002
  • 2001
  • 2000
  • 1999
  • 1998
  • 1997
  • 1996
  • 1995
  • 2014

  • 2015

  • 2016

  • 2017

By 2018
the digital universe could
have doubled in size

By 2018 the
digital universe
could have
doubled in size

Cutting edge IT research at Swinburne has enabled the design and construction of a supercomputer set to change the future of digital technology.

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By 2020
all new cars could communicate
with each other

By 2020 all
new cars could
communicate
with each other

Swinburne's vehicle-to-vehicle communication research will allow the exchange of data between nearby cars. Using this technology, new vehicles will track routes and avoid hazards without driver interference.

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By 2022
entire films could transfer to
smartphone devices in two seconds

By 2022 entire films
could transfer to
smartphone devices in
less than two seconds

Swinburne has joined forces with Telstra Corporation Ltd to isolate radiofrequency emissions from the outside world, moulding them to work faster than ever before.

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By 2025
mankind will see back in time
to the universe's beginnings

By 2025 mankind
will see back in time,
to the universe's
beginnings

Swinburne's astrophysicists have begun construction on the world's largest, most powerful telescope, the SKA. Using this telescope, researchers will be able to look back in time, studying galactic events from billions of years ago.

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By 2026
third world infant mortality rates
could have decreased by 67%

By 2026 third world
infant mortality rates
could have decreased
by 67%

The Infant Incubator, designed by a Swinburne graduate for developing countries, would be engineered to use solar energy to create a humidified environment for ill infants. If funding is granted, the project may reduce mortality rates and boost local economies in third world countries.

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By 2028
mental illness could be treated
before symptoms occur

By 2028, mental
illness could be
treated before
symptoms occur

Swinburne University has acquired Victoria's first magnetoencephalograph (MEG) machine. With further research brain activity will be mapped in real time, allowing treatment before severe onset of mental illness.

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By 2030
new cars will be equipped with
accident-proof capabilities

By 2030 new cars
will be equipped
with accident-proof
capabilities

Swinburne's Information and Communication Technology department is developing software which will enable all new cars to drive themselves. These vehicles will use risk calculation technology to avoid collision, traffic congestion and suggest eco-friendly routes.

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By 2032
implant infections are
a near impossibility

By 2032 implant
infections
are a near
impossibility

Imitating bacteria-resilient dragon fly wings, Swinburne is designing implant surfaces immune to infection in the human body. These transplants, inspired by nature, will decrease chances of implant infection dramatically.

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By 2035
infant speech could be
understood without language

By 2035 infant
speech could be
understood without
language

Swinburne's Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre is using innovative techniques to track and understand infant eye movement and speech. This research will allow parents to understand communication regardless of childhood development.

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Be future
ready

We're a university that's always two steps ahead, and believe that living in the moment, is a thing of the past.

Slide the arrow along the timeline above to see how Swinburne University is already shaping the future.

  • Be future
    ready

    We're a university that's always two steps ahead, and believe
    that living in the moment, is a thing of the past.

    Swipe along the timeline above to see how Swinburne University
    is already shaping the future.

  • By 2018 the digital universe could have doubled in size

    Cutting edge IT research at Swinburne has enabled the design and construction of a supercomputer set to change the future of digital technology.

  • By 2020 all new cars could communicate with each other

    Swinburne's vehicle-to-vehicle communication research will allow the exchange of data between nearby cars. Using this technology, new vehicles will track routes and avoid hazards without driver interference.

  • By 2022 entire films could transfer to smartphone devices in less than two seconds

    Swinburne has joined forces with Telstra Corporation Ltd to isolate radiofrequency emissions from the outside world, moulding them to work faster than ever before.

  • By 2025 mankind will see back in time, to the universe's beginnings

    Swinburne's astrophysicists have begun construction on the world's largest, most powerful telescope, the SKA. Using this telescope, researchers will be able to look back in time, studying galactic events from billions of years ago.

  • By 2026 third world infant mortality rates could have decreased by 67%

    The Infant Incubator, designed by a Swinburne graduate for developing countries, would be engineered to use solar energy to create a humidified environment for ill infants. If funding is granted, the project may reduce mortality rates and boost local economies in third world countries.

  • By 2028, mental illness could be treated before symptoms occur

    Swinburne University has acquired Victoria's first magnetoencephalograph (MEG) machine. With further research brain activity will be mapped in real time, allowing treatment before severe onset of mental illness.

  • By 2030 new cars will be equipped with accident-proof capabilities

    Swinburne's Information and Communication Technology department is developing software which will enable all new cars to drive themselves. These vehicles will use risk calculation technology to avoid collision, traffic congestion and suggest eco-friendly routes.

  • By 2032 implant infections are a near impossibility

    Imitating bacteria-resilient dragon fly wings, Swinburne is designing implant surfaces immune to infection in the human body. These transplants, inspired by nature, will decrease chances of implant infection dramatically.

  • By 2035 infant speech could be understood without language

    Swinburne's Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre is using innovative techniques to track and understand infant eye movement and speech. This research will allow parents to understand communication regardless of childhood development.

Lead new
discoveries

Radiofrequency Research Lab

Swinburne's Radiofrequency Dosimetry Laboratory is leading research in radiofrequency transmissions.

Forward thinking in business

Swinburne's modern approach to business combines industry experts with innovative technology, inspiring a wealth of opportunity for graduates.

Insect wings help human implants

Professor Russell Crawford and Professor Elena Ivanova present a discussion on mimicking insect wing surfaces to repel bacteria in human implants.

3D Virtual Reality Theatre

Swinburne's 3D Virtual Reality Theatre uses supercomputer technology to produce immersive visuals.

The future of driverless cars

Professor Hai Vu discusses the future of intelligent transport systems and driverless cars.

The Infant Incubator

Graduate Engineer David McCourt presents the Infant Incubator, a life-saving device designed specifically for third world countries.

3D Virtual Reality Theatre

Swinburne's 3D Virtual Reality Theatre uses supercomputer technology to produce immersive visuals.

Astronomers look back in time

Professor Matthew Bailes discusses the future use of the world's largest telescope, currently in production, to look back in time.

Find a solution
the world can't ignore

Make things that
make a difference

Design things
that could change
the world

Build a business
that breaks the mould

Change the way
our world communicates

Graduate work

Blue monday

Blue Monday

This project by honours graduates Amy Clemens, Andrew Robertson, Carly Curmi and Emily Wapling was created to raise awareness of mental health issues, changing the way our world views depression.

LIFX

LIFX

Andrew Brit, a graduate of Swinburne's Master of Entrepreneurship and Innovation, is the person behind LIFX, a multi-million dollar lighting brand exported globally. LIFX leads the way to a brighter future.

Formula SAE electronic race car

Formula SAE electronic race car

Swinburne students have built an electronic race car, meaning we're one step closer to using electricity over petrol to run our own cars.

Cypress light fixture

Cypress light fixture

The Cypress Light Fixture, designed by Swinburne Industrial Design graduate Edward Linacre, was inspired by the Cypress tree. This unique and innovative design has seen its designer take out the eMAGINE 3D Laser Design Competition. A fixture never before seen for the world of tomorrow.

The bionic eye

The bionic eye

Laser nerve stimulation is the focus of Swinburne's optic research, developing a vision of prosthesis which may result in a tiny laser device fitted into spectacles. Much like a cochlear implant restores hearing, this laser device has the potential to restore sight.

Microscopic nanoparticles fixed to optical nerves could become the key to restoring vision in people who have lost sight.

Star clusters

Star clusters

An international team led by Swinburne astronomers has revealed two distinct populations of star clusters, surrounded by radically different chemical compositions.

Swinburne astrophysicist, Dr Jeffrey Cooke, led the discovery of two 'super-luminous' supernovae - stellar explosions 10 to 100 times brighter than other supernova – a record for the most distant supernova yet detected.

In addition to supernovae discoveries, Swinburne is leading the international conversation on predicting extreme weather events.

Using astronomy to predict the future, Swinburne is leading the way.

Gunter's Fables

Gunter's Fables

Digital Media Design students explored the potential for using digital media to communicate and enhance a popular series of children's books titled Gunter's Fables. Research included the development of animated versions, the creation of interactive outcomes and investigation into modernised promotion and publishing.

By adapting the way children see literature, Swinburne is set to improve the future of education globally.

Lamb slam

Lamb slam

Lamb Slam is a colourful, family-friendly game for iOS and Android created by Games and Interactivity students for Gridstone.

The Worlds of Navitas

The Worlds of Navitas is a video game created by students studying games and interactivity at Swinburne.

The Worlds of Navitas

'Hath no man'

Student short film, 'Hath no man', won its 8th international award in July at the new Hope Film Festival in Pennsylvania, USA. Written and directed by Swinburne student, Linus Koh, the film won the 'Best Student Film' category at the festival. 'Hath No Man' tells the story of camaraderie, friendship and love between an Australian war cameraman and his battlefield comrade, seen through the eyes of an Australian World War II veteran reminiscing of his time in Crete in 1941.

'Spit'

'Spit'

Directed by Swinburne Film and Television student Amy Dellar, 'Spit' follows seventeen-year-old Chloe in working class suburbia as she tries to accept her first love as just a friend. Produced by Alice Krieger and edited by Anthony Juchnevicius.

'Ten Quintillion'

'Ten Quintillion'

Film and television student, Romilly Spiers, took out the 45th Annual Worldfest-Houston International Film Festivals's top award for her short film, 'Ten Quintillion'. The film won a Grand Remi for Experimental Film and Video.

'Ten Quintillion' is a nature film that uses innovative cinematography and sound techniques to explore creatures and plants that inhabit the suburban garden.

Early cancer detecting sensor

Early cancer detecting sensor

Researchers at Swinburne are developing a cutting edge sensor that will help detect and diagnose cancers early, potentially saving more lives. This new technology is the vision of PhD researcher Emma Carland and is based on an optical-fibre touch sensor as fine as a human hair.

This research could result in the early detection of tumours by vibrating the sensor against body tissue, changing the future of cancer forever.

Inspire
others

In 2013 we began our partnership with TEDxMelbourne, a conference opportunity allowing us to spread forward-thinking ideas to a larger audience.

TEDxMelbourne is part of a global set of seminars based on the mantra "ideas worth spreading". Each event invites thinkers of tomorrow to provoke inspiring conversation.

Our involvement with TEDxMelbourne is just one of the things we have done to provoke future thinking.

Arts and
Social Sciences

Studying arts and social sciences is a great choice if you're interested in discovering why different things drive different people, learning about human interaction and behaviour, or exploring the connections between social science and communication. Whether through literature, politics or health, you'll examine people and their environments, and gain the research, analytical and communication skills to build a career.

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Aviation

Aviation is an evolving industry at the forefront of technology and business. Whether you're interested in flying commercial aircraft or managing operations on the ground, we offer courses that pave the way to a successful career.

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Business and
Management

Studying a business-related degree will give you skills and knowledge that can be applied and are valued in any industry, anywhere in the world.

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Design

Swinburne's prestigious design courses let you combine imagination and innovation with smart business sense. You'll learn how to harness your natural creativity and apply it in industry.

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Digital Media

Digital media is revolutionising the way we access information, do business, are governed and how we interact with each other. Our industry-relevant courses, with their hands-on approach, can open up career opportunities in the digital media, media and games industries.

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Engineering

Across Australia and the world, businesses are seeking employees with the knowledge and skills to design, build and maintain innovative products. Next-generation computers and tablets, smartphones, low-emission cars, biomechanical limbs and industrial robots are just some of the products created by engineers. As an engineering graduate, you'll be recognised for your ability to create solutions to today's problems.

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Environment and
Land Management

If the great outdoors is where you want to work, an environment and land management course is the perfect choice. As an environment and land management graduate you can be lucky enough to do what you love and love what you do – a chance not offered to many.

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Film and Television

A Swinburne course in film and television can help you master production skills, develop your scriptwriting talents and begin your career in cinematography, animation, special effects and more. You'll learn how to harness your natural creativity and apply it in industry.

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Health Sciences
and Community Care

Health sciences and community care courses provide the skills required to assist and improve the wellbeing of communities and groups across Australia and the world – and make a real difference.

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Information and
Communication Technologies

Dynamic and constantly evolving, the field of information and communication technologies (ICT) provides exciting and challenging career opportunities. ICT is the backbone of many industries – health, transport, finance, media, manufacturing and automotive – so the skills you'll learn will be highly valued by many employers.

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Media and
Communications

A media and communications qualification could be your entry point into a wide range of exciting career opportunities. You'll discover how to develop innovative communications campaigns, learn about new media technologies and the way media is evolving, and explore the connections between media, public relations and design.

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Psychology

If being able to understand and explain human behaviour and relationships interests you, a degree in psychology could be the right choice.

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Science

Scientific and technological knowledge is advancing at an unprecedented rate. By encouraging you to put your natural curiosity to practical use, Swinburne's science qualifications put you on a career path of inquiry and discovery.

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Vocational Education
and Training

Whether you are preparing for your first job, looking to retrain or taking the first step in a career change, a certificate, diploma or advanced diploma could be the right choice for you. These courses are focused on learning for work, or in many cases, learning at work. They help you to build the practical skills and technical expertise that make you employable.

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How to apply

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Apply by email, post or in person

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Enquire now

You can contact us by telephone on 1300 275 794 between 9am and 5.30pm, Monday to Friday.
If you have a course-related enquiry, please complete the form below or email study@swinburne.edu.au

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